Business Buzz: Nosh Kitchen to Close Downtown Location; Moorhead Freez will open March 11; and more – InForum


After only a few months in downtown Fargo, Nosh Kitchen is closing.

Although the unique bakery is not closing permanently, it is returning to its home bakery roots.

Owner Kelly Burm broke the news to her customers in a Facebook post on Tuesday morning, March 1. “We regret to inform you that Nosh Kitchen has decided to close our business. Our last day of activity will be March 31. After this date, Nosh Kitchen will resume operations from our little bakery at home, just like the good old days. Unfortunately, this means we will lose our commercial kitchen and cannot sell directly to businesses, but we can certainly still sell directly to consumers,” the Facebook post reads.

“The decision to close this business was not an easy one, but due to the economy, continued price increases, staff shortages, and declining sales and traffic, we will have to say goodbye,” Burm wrote, thanking customers and employees. . “We will continue to take orders throughout the month so please order before it’s too late! We have some fantastic items to choose from. Upcoming commands/events will still be executed, so don’t worry! We still have you!

“I would like to thank all of our customers and employees of our company with whom we have done business during this period. We appreciate your support and loyalty. Thank you for being with our company through all the ups and downs. Remember to always be gentle,” the post read.

Kelly Burm opens the door to the old Twist bar and restaurant in downtown Fargo on Wednesday, Dec. 8, 2021. Burm announced on Tuesday, March 1 that she plans to close the downtown location at the end of the month . Helmut Schmidt / The Forum

The Forum has contacted Burm, but she declined to comment further at this time.

Nosh opened in mid-December in the former Twist bar and restaurant at 220 Broadway N., directly across from the RDO building in the heart of downtown.

The company is known for its wide range of sweets – cookies, scones, muffins, dessert breads, cupcakes, bars, as well as biscotti and focaccia. Take-out meals are also on the menu. Burm has also added takeout to its menu.

Nosh Kitchen got its start in Burm’s West Fargo kitchen nearly three years ago.

031921.B.FF.FREEZ.1

Co-owner Jessica Malvin stands outside the former Tastee Freez restaurant on Wednesday, March 17, 2021, at 410 19th St. S., Moorhead. The restaurant is scheduled to open for the season on Friday, March 11. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

Moorhead Freez will open on March 11

The Freez, 410 19th St. S., Moorhead, is scheduled to open Friday, March 11 for the season.

The owners announced on February 25 that they were postponing their opening date due to the continued cold.

Co-owner Jessica Malvin confirmed Tuesday (March 1) that her goal is to open March 11.

This will be the restaurant’s second season as The Freez. The restaurant near Moorhead’s 20th/21st Street railway underpass was previously part of the Tastee Freeze franchise.

To confirm that they will reach their targeted opening date, follow ”

Moorhead Freez

” on Facebook.

Online grocer Misfits Market launched in ND

Misfit Market

an online grocer dedicated to making affordable, high-quality food more accessible while helping break the cycle of food waste, is now doing business in North Dakota.

Open box with dairy products.jpg
Misfits Market, an online grocery store dedicated to “ending food deserts and ending food apartheid in America by 2025,” is now doing business in North Dakota.

Contributed / Misfits Market

The brand also recently launched in Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota, making its products available in the lower 48 states.

According to a press release, Misfits Market began as a mystery box of organic produce, hand-delivered with a combination of rented vans and carpools in Philadelphia. Today, the organization is a nationwide grocery retailer offering organic produce, high-quality meats and seafood, plant-based protein, staple food and dairy categories, newly launched bakery and wine.

The company has created a supply chain focused on building relationships with farmers, distributors and producers to eliminate food waste while expanding access to food.

Interested buyers can create a profile on

https://www.misfitsmarket.com/sign-up

to start receiving weekly deliveries. The first delivery will include the company’s best-selling groceries, then shoppers can customize their orders from any of the more than 500 items offered by Misfits Market. The groceries will be delivered to your door.

The Most Hated Business Buzzwords

Business “buzzwords” seem like a double-edged sword.

On the one hand, studies show that four out of five Americans think they make the people who use them smarter — and have even kicked off our own share of “win-win” and “backtracking” in efforts to reinforce this perception.

On the other, a little piece of us dies inside every time we hear “the new normal” or “bring to the table” for the umpteenth time.

In fact, some buzzwords are so reviled that they will keep people from applying for certain jobs. So the next time you post a job, the experts at Inc. recommend avoiding the following buzzwords like the proverbial plague:

  • “We are looking for a rock star.” The implied meaning seems to be: “No pressure of anything, but we expect you to impress us with everything we do.”
  • “Wear many hats.” Translation: “We really need to hire multiple people, but we’ll have you do multiple jobs instead to save money.”
  • “Thick skin.” Translates to: “Welcome to the Kevin Spacey School of Real-Estate Management. I hope you don’t mind putting up with harsh criticism, name-calling, or belittlement. Perhaps the workplace should consider changing his toxic environment instead of just trying to hire people who are too callous or downtrodden to complain.
  • “Work hard, play hard.” What does that even mean? Why should after-hours activities have anything to do with your work ethic at work? We suspect it’s code for: “We’re looking for young people who will work constantly and don’t have kids.”
  • “Ninja”. This word literally means someone who is trained in ancient Japanese martial arts for purposes of espionage or murder, which seems like a tall order when someone is making $15/hour. As with “rockstar”, this term implies that they are looking for a miracle worker who can do the work of three employees at once. It’s a lot of pressure.

The creators of Preply, the language learning app, have also included some of today’s most hated buzzwords. Check out the top 10 offenders in the attached graphic – and get ready to cringe.

the-most-boring-corporate-jargon.jpg

Contributed / Preply


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